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Apologies for not having updates for this page in a while. I’ve noticed some traffic hitting the previous Pseudo Channel stories and wanted to drop a message here to talk about the current status of the project.

Please Stand By

I have been hard at work migrating Pseudo Channel to Python 3 with the hopes of taking advantage of some of the more recent updates to the Python Plex API in the future. I have also been stripping out the existing bash scripts and replacing their functionality with python scripts to make the project a little more platform independent.

I have also been…


I’ve previously written up instructions on how to configure FakeTV from the software end. I suggest giving this a read if you’re looking for software setup instructions. This post will focus on the hardware and how I housed it inside of an old VCR.

Hardware Overview

When I set out to create FakeTV, I wanted to recreate the classic TV broadcast experience typical of the 80s and 90s. Once I had the internal hardware (an assortment of Raspberry Pis, hard drives, and power, ethernet and hdmi cables), it was time to find something to house this mess to keep it from being…


FakeTV has undergone a major shift to a new script called Pseudo Channel with exciting new features. If you’re already familiar with FakeTV, you can skip this next part, and if you want to get right to the setup instructions, scroll on down to the section titled “How to setup up your own FakeTV.”

What is FakeTV?

FakeTV grew out of a desire to recreate the broadcast television experience using a Plex Server and a few Raspberry Pis. As somebody who likes to have TV on in the background, navigating menus to change programs after every episode is cumbersome, and binge watching isn’t…


Configuring a USB remote control for FakeTV functions

These instructions are a segment of a multi-part series of instructions on the installation and setup of FakeTV, a simulated television broadcast experience.

My remote control works with my TV, sound bar and FakeTV

After the addition of the function that allows Pseudo Channel to ‘resume’ when launched, and the addition of multiple channel support, I sought out a remote to control basic functions. At first I tried a simple remote, but on realization that I had six separate remotes in my living room, I bought this 2.4GHz Mini Wireless Keyboard Remote Control. One of the reasons I chose this remote was its viability as a universal remote for TV and…


Setup and configuration of Psuedo Channel

These instructions are a segment of a multi-part series of instructions on the installation and setup of FakeTV, a simulated television broadcast experience.

My Plex Controller Raspberry Pi, seated with a 2.8" PiTfT screen before upgrading to the 3.5" screen.

Psuedo Channel is a python script that communicates with the Plex server and client to coordinate scheduled playback. Once set up, it will read the pseudo_schedule.xml file to build the schedule of TV shows and movies and inject commercials into the breaks between.

My setup is running on a Raspberry Pi 2 B+ with an attached 3.5" display for status information (more on that here). …


Setup and configuration of RasPlex for ‘touchless’ viewing

These instructions are a segment of a multi-part series of instructions on the installation and setup of FakeTV, a simulated television broadcast experience.

My Raspberry Pi 3 running RasPlex

I chose to use a Raspberry Pi for this setup because I wanted a dedicated device that could occupy one of the HDMI ports as if it were a cable tuner. Pseudo Channel works best with a dedicated, always-on client that isn’t used for general on-demand viewing. In addition to the Raspberry Pi, you’ll need a power cable, microSD card (4GB minimum), ethernet cable (don’t trust this to WiFi) and HDMI cable to connect to the TV.

Download and install the software


These instructions are a segment of a multi-part series of instructions on the installation and setup of FakeTV, a simulated television broadcast experience.

If you’ve been following the saga of FakeTV, you may already be aware that I purchased an old Sony SLV-575UC VCR from a thrift store for $1 and gutted it to house my entire Plex FakeTV setup. In doing this, I originally included a 2.8" PiTFT screen and set it up to display what is currently playing on FakeTV. Recently, I upgraded this to the 3.5" screen to fill out the space in the LED window.

Screen Installation


Note: These instructions are out of date. FakeTV uses a different script and has had some enhancement since this was written.

FakeTV when ‘off-air’

I’ve been asked a few times to get full installation instructions for FakeTV. So here it is, how to set up your very own simulated broadcast station. I realized while putting this together that FakeTV is made up of a lot of different parts working together and talking to each other. To keep things organized, I’ll be breaking down the instructions first by hardware, then by software when necessary.

Plex Server Installation

This is first because it’s the most important. Your Plex…


The screen displays what’s currently playing to the television.

Well, it’s been some time since I wrote about FakeTV and a lot has changed since then, so we’re about due for an update. You might also notice that I rebranded this blog to be FakeTV specific, since that’s all I post about on here anyway.


If you don’t know what FakeTV is, or why it’s evolved, the short answer is that it’s a self-contained, simulated television broadcast experience or FakeTV for short. As for how it evolved, allow me to point you back towards my last write-up on it. However that’s not required reading. Though if you do read it, you may notice the next section is very familiar.

The Concept

The original idea that lead me on the search to set this thing up came from long ago, when I played around with XBMC. There was a plugin for XBMC (and still is for…

FakeTV

A blog to discuss my simulated broadcast television experience using three Raspberry Pis, two hard drives and software/scripting to tie it all together.

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